Toll Collection: GPS System Set to Replace FASTags soon

There’s a big change on the horizon for toll collection in India as the government plans to introduce a GPS-based system, possibly replacing the current FASTag system. The Minister of Road Transport & Highways, Nitin Gadkari, shared that the government is exploring new technologies for toll collection, including this GPS-based approach.

If implemented, this could mean saying goodbye to toll plazas and the FASTag system we’ve become familiar with.

Rise of GPS Toll Collection

The GPS toll collection system is already in the testing phase and has been put into action on some highways, including the recently inaugurated Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee Trans harbour link road in Mumbai.

Minister Gadkari announced this new toll collection system in December 2023, stating that it could be rolled out nationwide by March the following year.

How GPS Toll Collection Works

Unlike FASTags that rely on RFID-enabled barriers at toll plazas, the GPS system takes a different approach. This innovative system scans the moving vehicles’ number plates using cameras and Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) technology. The toll fees are then automatically deducted from the linked bank accounts.

The major advantage of the GPS toll collection system is that vehicles won’t need to come to a complete stop at toll plazas. Instead, the cameras capture the number plates on the go, saving considerable time for commuters. This efficient process aims to eliminate the long queues typically seen at toll booths.

GPS Toll Collection vs. FASTags

Comparing the GPS toll collection system to FASTags, there are notable differences. FASTags utilize RFID-enabled barriers at toll plazas to scan the FASTag IDs on vehicles for toll fee deduction. While FASTags did reduce waiting times significantly, some challenges persisted, such as insufficient balance or long queues leading to traffic congestion near toll booths.

On the other hand, the GPS system streamlines the toll collection process further. With no need for vehicles to stop at toll plazas, the cameras take care of capturing number plates and deducting toll fees seamlessly. This advancement is expected to address the concerns of long queues and enhance the overall efficiency of toll collection.

The government aims to implement the GPS toll collection system on most highways across India by early April this year. This ambitious timeline reflects the commitment to introducing a more efficient and streamlined toll collection process for the benefit of commuters.

For everyday commuters, the shift from FASTags to a GPS-based system could mean a more seamless travel experience. With the elimination of toll booths and the need to stop, vehicles can move through the toll collection points without delays. This not only saves time but also contributes to smoother traffic flow on highways.

Positive takeaway

The upcoming introduction of the GPS toll collection system signifies a significant leap in toll collection technology. By embracing innovation and leveraging GPS and ANPR technologies, the government aims to create a more efficient, time-saving, and hassle-free experience for Indian commuters on the nation’s highways.

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Rishika Choudhury

Content Writer

CATEGORIES Business Agriculture Technology Environment Health Education

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