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POSITIVE BREAKING

'SAMUDRAYAN': INDIA'S FIRST MANNED OCEAN MISSION

by P Sai Shruti

Read Time: 1 minute


India has made significant advances in science and technology. Adding another feather to its attainment, India has launched its first manned ocean mission. The mission is 'Samudrayan'. Samudrayan will help in exploring the depth of the ocean. It will also assist in the exploration of marine resources for drinking water and renewable energy sources.

India joins elite club
In Chennai, India's first manned ocean mission, Samudrayan was launched. With this, India has now joined the elite club of countries that have such underwater vehicles. The countries include the United States, Russia, Japan, France, and China.

Matsya 6000
Under the Samudrayan initiative, a deep-sea vehicle named the Matsya 6000 is designed. It is built to transport three people in a titanium alloy personnel sphere with a 2.1-meter diameter enclosed enclosure.
Matsya 6000 will have 12-hour battery life. Along with it, it will also have a 96-hour backup battery, in case of an emergency. It has the potential to work at depths of 1000 to 5500 meters.

Benefits of Matsya 6000
The vehicle is a platform to carry any devices, sensors, etc. to deep-sea for experiments or observations in the presence of a human being.

When one goes up into space, another would dive deep into the ocean

"Launched India’s First Manned Ocean Mission #Samudrayan at #Chennai. India joins the elite club of select nations USA, Russia, Japan, France & China having such underwater vehicles. A new chapter opens to explore ocean resources for drinking water, clean energy & blue economy,” Union minister, Jitendra Singh tweeted.

Further, he said, “India has made huge progress in science and technology and when an Indian goes up into space as part of the Gaganyaan program, another would dive deep into the ocean”.
According to the press release, the deep-sea vehicle will be able to manoeuvre on the deep-seafloor with six degrees of freedom for four hours at a depth of 6000 meters utilizing a battery-powered propulsion system.

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